PaPa Mike Canterino

Papa” Mike Canterino

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/1116763438&color=%23ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true&visual=trueNicky F0str · Zoot Sims & Maxine Sullivan @ Half Note Club NY

Mike Canterino and Duke Ellington at the Half Note Club sitting at the bar.
Mike and Sonny Canterino Behind the Half Note Club Bar

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Mike Canterino.             Author:  Mike Longo

I first met Mike Canterino in 1962 I was a young man in New York to pursue jazz. I can remember venturing down to The Half Note Club to hear the John Coltrane Quartet. The place was so packed that I was barely able to get into the door and so I stood right inside the door amidst a wall of people packed like sardines. I listened to a whole set and didn’t spend a dime because it was too crowded for the waiter to get to where I was and I remember feeling “This is great! I got to hear the music of his caliber and all I paid was the subway fare to get there and back.” At the time I was poor as a church mouse and hadn’t broken in yet on the New York Scene. I remember also feeling “What a soulful place.” “Nobody seems to care that I’m not paying for this music and somehow I feel welcome anyway.” It wasn’t until about a year later that my friend Ross Thompkins sent me there to sub for him with Zoot Simms that I met the Canterino family. I recall, since I was still struggling, I was hungry and I wanted to order some food and Mama Canterino asked me if I’d like a meatball sandwich on Italian bread. Of Course, I did and she brought it out and it was delicious. At the end of the night after I got paid I went to pay my bill and they wouldn’t accept any money. Wow, I thought, “Who are these people?” Back then New York was a cold place and people didn’t treat people as well as they do now. I sort of recall that the meatball sandwich was the only food I had that day. Mike was the bartender and Judy was working the cloakroom. The mother and father were running the kitchen. They all took a liking to me and seemed to like the way I played. I couldn’t believe how warm and friendly they were and I knew right away that I was in the presence of some really special folks who genuinely love this music and the people who play it. Judy was like this beautiful angel and Mike was like the most accepting guy who loved musicians regardless of their flaws and fallacies. For example, a musician would show up drunk are in most cases would be booted out and told he would never work there again. Not the Canterino family. They would have a genuine concern for the musician and pour black coffee down I’m and try to get him sober enough to make the gig. Then they would pay him in the and as in nothing happened. And furthermore, they would book him back because they were very understanding and had a genuine love for this music and the people who played it. I cannot recall any place in the world where I witnessed such compassion towards musicians in a jazz club than the Half Note and the people who ran it. They were like family to the whole community of jazz musicians who played there. I became friendly with Mike and Judy and Sonney as well as Mom and Pop whose memory is still with me too this very day. If you were a jazz musician and scuffing in New York you felt like you were home with family anytime you were in the Half Note. One of the things I recall about the place was the number of people who fell off the band start there.  I remember Billy Butterfield being drunk and falling off into the coatroom and demolishing it, Judy was in there, if I recall and, and the first thing they did was to make sure Billy was not hurt. The next thing they did was roll on the floor with laughter. That’s the kind of people they were, I recall Major Holly falling and breaking his arm. I had the distinction of falling off myself when I was working there with James Moody and Moody, who was my best friend in life, ran into the coatroom and hid his head among the coats so I wouldn’t see him laughing at me. That was Moody’s thing. If you’d slip on a banana peel he would make sure you were breathing and didn’t need an ambulance and then he would be rolling on the ground laughing.

I remember Mike and Judy as the most inviting people who always treated me with love and respect.

Mike Canterino

I first met Mike Canterino in 1992. I was a young man in New York to pursue jazz. I can remember venturing down to Hudson and Spring Street to hear the John Coltrane Quartet. The place was so packed that I was barely able to get into the door and so I stood right inside the door amidst a wall of people packed like sardines. I listened to a whole set and didn’t spend a dime because it was too crowded for the waiter to get to where I was and I remember feeling “This is great! I got to hear the music of his caliber and all I paid was the subway fare to get there and back.” At the time I was poor as a church mouse and hadn’t broken in yet on the New York Scene. I remember also feeling “What a soulful place.” “Nobody seems to care that I’m not paying for this music and somehow I fell welcome anyway.” It wasn’t until about a year later that my friend Ross Thompkins sent me there to sub for him with Zoot Simms that I met the Canterino family. I recall, since I was still struggling, I was hungry and I wanted to order some food and Mama Canterino asked me if I’d like a meatball sandwich on Italian bread. Of Course, I did and she brought it out and it was delicious. At the end of the night after I got paid I went to pay my bill and they wouldn’t accept any money. Wow, I thought, “Who are these people?” Back then New York was a cold place and people didn’t treat people as well as they do now. I sort of recall that the meatball sandwich was the only food I had that day. Mike was the bartender and Judy was working the cloakroom. The mother and father were running the kitchen. They all took a liking to me and seemed to like the way I played. I couldn’t believe how warm and friendly they were and I knew right away that I was in the presence of some really special folks who genuinely love this music and the people who play it. Judy was like this beautiful angel and Mike was like the most accepting guy who loved musicians regardless of their flaws and fallacies. For example, a musician would show up drunk are in most cases would be booted out and told he would never work there again. Not the Canterino family. They would have a genuine concern for the musician and pour black coffee down I’m and try to get him sober enough to make the gig. Then they would pay him in the and as in nothing happened. And furthermore, they would book him back because they were very understanding and had a genuine love for this music and the people who played it. I cannot recall any place in the world where I witnessed such compassion towards musicians in a jazz club than the Half Note and the people who ran it. They were like family to the whole community of jazz musicians who played there. I became friendly with Mike and Judy and Sonney as well as Mom and Pop whose memory is still with me to this very day. If you were a jazz musician and scuffing in New York you felt like you were home with the family anytime you were in the Half Note. One of the things I recall about the place was the number of people who fell off the band start there.  I remember Billy Butterfield being drunk and falling off into the coatroom and demolishing it, Judy was in there, if I recall and, and the first thing they did was to make sure Billy was not hurt. The next thing they did was roll on the floor with laughter. That’s the kind of people they were, I recall Major Holly falling and breaking his arm. I had the distinction of falling off myself when I was working there with James Moody and Moody, who was my best friend in life, ran into the coatroom and hid his head among the coats so I wouldn’t see him laughing at me. That was Moody’s thing. If you’d slip on a banana peel he would make sure you were breathing and didn’t need an ambulance and then he would be rolling on the ground laughing.

I remember Mike and Judy as the most inviting people who always treated me with love and respect. They frequently gave me work there and when they moved uptown they booked me as a

Mike Canterino Half Note Club

The Half note club was the most popular real-to-life jazz club in New York City, New York that developed in two places of Manhattan are SoHo and Midtown. The original Half Note Club was in SoHo at 289 Hudson street at spring street from 1957 to 1972 when the Half Note club made a move to a Midtown location at 149 west 54th street, one block west of the Museum of Modern Art from 1972 to 1974.

Today you would have to travel to Overseas:
The half note jazz club is all-time elegant in Athens, with a victorious history that goes back to 1979. The half note jazz club is the most intimate live club of Athens. It is one of the most successful clubs. It contributed significantly to the formation of the Jazz stage in Greece. internationally famous and Greek musicians from the jazz scene have performed right here over the years. Every year from October to May, they collect 250 concert events with about 30 specific bands from all over the world. The music that plays in Half note now covers a very broad range of music from all over the world.

History of the Half Note Club

Mike Canterino was the founder of the Half Note Club. Actually, the Half Note club relates to the family: Michael Canterino, his siblings Sonny Canterino and Rosemarie Canterino, his parents Frank Canterino and Jean Canterino. In 1960, Judie Marie married Mike Canterino and became a part of the family. Actually, Judi Marie Canterino is a Jazz singer. The Half Note club, a Jazz joint in New York City, New York that plumed in two Manhattan stations _from 1957 to 1972 in SoHo (then recounted as the village) at 289 Hudson Street at Spring Street and from 1972 to 1974 in the West 54th Street, one block west of the Museum of Modern Art. The club accords to the family Canterino: Michael Canterino his brother, Sonny Canterino not Dominic, their Sister, rosemary Canterino, and their parents, Frank Canterino not Francis, 1906 to 1979 and Jean Canterino aka Concetta Italiano, 1906 to 1989. Judy Marie, a swing jazz singer, became an integral part of the family when she married Michael in 1960. The Half Note Club was a staple to the promising jazz musicians in the 1950s and 1960s, the budget induced with Friday night live WABC radio show called jazz descriptions, organized by the venue of Alan Grant Abraham Grockowsky, 1919 to 2012. The half note club was one of the exiguous nationally known Nightclubs of Manhattan, containing the village vanguard, the village gate, five spot, and club saloon_ that engage in the glorious jazz performances on a near-daily basis. Declining the popular set times, at the Half Note club the artists were allowed to play on stage as long as they wanted. Many musicians made the Half Note club theirs after hours home.

In 1972, Mike and Sonny Canterino stepped to a new Half Note Club in Midtown at 149 West 54th Street, in what was once the Contredanse. Roger Brousso, the record distributor from Connecticut, devotes $240.000 to a new venue. The order consisted of friend Tate and Budd Johnson, beboppers Al Cohn and Zoot Sims, avant-garde John Mingus and Wes Montgomery, Herbie Mann, and Cannonball Adderly. Singer Anita Odei, Billie Holliday, and one night, Judy Garland additionally performed. The Half Note Club closed January 1,1975.

How was the half note created?

For the first time i

My uncle Mike joined the Navy at the age of 18 and his ship was anchored in Jacksonville Florida. There were many jazz bars in the south. Mike used to go here often and spent a lot of his time here. Actually, Mike’s personality was very entertaining. Mike’s mother and father had their own bar called Frank and Jeans Bar in Manhattan on Hudson and Spring Street that provided the delicious meatball sandwiches in town. Mike thought that when he left the Navy, he would ask his parents to turn this place into a Jazz Club. His parents said yes and the rest of the History is before you. The Half note was created!

The Half Note took some time but soon it became the most famous club in the city. The musicians had a lot of fun working here because they all worked as a family here. Many musicians became friends not only with our family but also with all customers who came here all year round. Then in 1960, Mike and Judi got married. From 1957 to 1972, the club made great strides on Hudson and Spring. Then they thought of moving the club to 54th street. But sadly, it only lasted 3 years and stopped. Now it is located in Midtown and engaged by London, New York.

Moving forward to 2020-Disney determined to use the Half note in their new animated feature film “Soul” where the club was designated as a great jazz place to play. Half note and its history tell us how Mike made this club for music with love and devotion. Basically, Half Note Club was a best way to signify the promising jazz musicians in 1950s and 1960s, the charges experienced with Friday Night live WABC radio show called Jazz portraits, arranged by the venue of Alan Grant.

Judi Marie Canterino

Swing Jazz Singer

Biography

If Dreams Come True 

Jazz singing is touching a new high with all the new ones coming in the field and making a lot of innovation in the field. Back in the day when there were only a few jazz singers and who are also not much innovative with their craft Judie Marie Canterino the last Swing Jazz Singer was the one who started it all with a new twist. Judi Marie Canterino Marie was schooled by Lennie Tristano, and Judi Marie Canterino today the last of the Swing Jazz Singers, had the honor to listen to all the amazing instrumentalists who played at The Half Note Club. Judi Marie Canterino is one of those people who sing in a natural style and work her skills in the most efficient manner. Judi Marie the Swing Jazz Singer is always relaxed and enjoying herself while singing in her natural style of a Swing Jazz Singer. 

Judi Marie  Canterino started working with Lennie Tristano, one of the most noted pianists of her era, in 1958 due to a saxophonist Souren Baronian. Judi Marie Canterino sang  along with solo musicians like Charlie Parker, Lester Young, Roy Eldridge, and Louis Armstrong. Judi Marie Canterino working on her vocals also sang along with singers. Lester Young, who was best known as “Prez” became Judie Marie’s favorite. Judi Marie Canterino the last Of the Swing Jazz Singers  made her debut singing a duet with Billie Holiday at The Half Note Club.Judi Marie related with her style the most. Judi Marie Canterino was conversant with the big bands at that time, she could still relate to it. Today’s Swing Jazz Singer Judi Marie Canterino used to listen to Fats Domino, The Platters, and Elvis. According to her succinct summation, “I went from Presley to Prez.”

The Half Note Club was run by the Canterino brothers, Mike and Sonny, and their parents. They invited Lenny Tristano to the club to play, and they had a friendly relationship with Tristano, so much so that they would help him pick a piano. “I started Jazz music (at the club) because I was a great fan of the art,” said Michael Canterino, Judi Marie’s husband, and a jazz promoter. “The Half Note used to be a family restaurant. I got a Coca Cola box and put a singer on it for our first bandstand”.

Judi Marie was always involved with jazz music, and she was known for her unique and swing jazz style that is steeped in a rich Musical History. Judi Marie Canterino started her musical training at the age of seven with the classical piano. She used to perform at the Julliard School of Music through her thirteenth year but then turned her efforts to voice training classically through high school.

Judi Marie, I was introduced to jazz at the age of 19 years old. She was so much interested in jazz singing that she visited the club and then became a regular the club. Judi Marie was introduced to the late Lennie Tristano who was a renowned jazz pianist and known to be a genius in the field. Judi Marie used to go to The Half Note Club on regular basis and develop a cordial bond with the family who owned the Half Note Club, It was a happy place and they shared a good relationship with every customer and singer who visited the Half Note club. Judi Marie became a Canterino when got close to one of the Canterino brothers, Michael Canterino. Judi Marie ended up marrying Mike Canterino the founder of the Half Note Club. 

When it was the early stages of her career, Judi Marie used to sit-in at The Half Note and sang with jazz greats like Zoot Sims, Wes Montgomery, Buddy Tate, Jimmy Rushing, Bud Johnson, Ross Tompkins, Milt Hinton, Doc Cheatham, Major Holly, Al Cohen, Roy Eldridge, Bobby Hackett, Jim Rushing and many more.

She learned under the mentorship of many great musicians, and she has been under the influence of many great singers as well, including Sinatra, Jimmy Rushing, Anita O’ Day, Billie Holiday, Rosemary Clooney, and Maxine Sullivan.  

In 1961-62, Judie Marie studied jazz again with Tristano, but she became a mother and performed her motherly duties with devotion. The Swing Jazz Singer stopped performing for many years while she raised her son, Michael Jr.  She still made time to perform at Scarborough Fair’s Restaurant and Marketplace with John Colliano on piano, Russel George on Electric Violin, and Jerry Bruno on bass fiddle.  Judi Marie Canterino shared the stage in 1969 with Judy Garland in Greenwich Village at the Half Note club; as it turned out later, it was Garland’s final public appearance s Garland died shortly after this performance.

Judie Marie, however, kept on singing, and she filled the Scarborough Fair’s Restaurants & Marketplace in Bronxville on Friday night with her sweet singing of jazz music. Judi Marie was a fan favorite, so she kept coming back. John Byrne, who owned one of the most popular restaurants and gourmet shops at 65 Ponfield Road since 1987, said that she was loved by people, and that is why she was always called back by him.  

Judi Marie used to appear regularly at Scarborough Fair’s Restaurant & Marketplace with her Half Note club All-stars for almost many years. Judi Marie the Swing Jazz Singer used to appear on Thursdays at Zio Cocconato in Larchmont and Saturdasy in Saxon Grill in White Plains on weekly basis. Judi Marie appeared in a jazz program at the Helen Hayes Theater in Nyack.

“Judi Marie just has a very cool sound, terrific to listen to especially on hot summer night,” said Jim Moore of Yonkers, who was a fan and a friend. “Judi Marie brings back the sounds of the old jazz greats,” he added. Judi Marie kept on singing professionally while she was a child and also when she was an adult for more than eight decades. Judi Marie Canterino the Swing Jazz Singer is still performing Today. 

Jussi Marie the Last of the swing Jazz singers, has sang with a number of legends of the past, including Tony Bennett, Anita O’Day, Billie Holiday, Rosemary Clooney (Judi Marie Canterino was George Clooney’s aunty).

Judie Marie Canterino was singing in the Half Note club one night when Garland came there to listen to O’Day, which was her friend. “She just walked up to the stage and decided she wanted to sit in and sing a number,” told Canterino, a resident of the Riverdale section of the Bronx for 30 years. “She was very weak. Her legs were like toothpicks, I had to help her get on stage.” Garland had a love for music, and she made it to the microphone, and the band started playing the notes from “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” which was Garland’s signature song from the 1989 classic, “The Wizard of Oz.” It was joint performance of Garland and Canterino before she was helped off the stage, and a few weeks later, Garland died in London. “It turned out to be her last appearance,” told Canterino.

Judi Marie used to love singing and never stopped, but it became a vocational thing as she sang with Teddy Wilson at Café Loup, Roy Eldridge at Jimmy Ryan’s, and Joe Venuti at Micheal’s Pub during the 70s. She was asked to sing with guitarist Joe Puma in 1989. This became a pattern of more regular activity. Judi Marie worked at the New York Hilton for three years and then appeared at the Fortune Garden with the like of Doc Chatham, Warren Vache, and Scott Hamilton. Then the venues changed into Trumpets, Shanghi  Jazz, La Belle Epoque, The Cupping Room, Michael Feinstein’s Room, the Kirano Jazz Club, the Indian Road Café. Other venues included New York Hilton, Montclair NJ, Struggles in NJ, New York’s Fortune Garden Pavilion, and Trio’s in Riverdale, NY.

Judi Marie was professionally associated to some of the great people related to jazz, including Steve Lamatina, Jerry Bruno, Jon Bunch, Conal Fowkes, Ted Firth, Kenny Daverne, Tony Careleo, Red Richards, Bucky Pizzarelli, Spanky Davis, Phil Bodner, Joe Cozuzzo, Mark Shane, Clark Terry, Chuck Folds, Norman Simmons, Scott Hamilton and Warren Vache are just to name a few. Her voice has been heard on international radio.

Judi Marie now dedicates all her performances to her late husband, Mike Canterino, with all her love. Some of her evergreens songs include “If Dreams Come True,” “Thou Swell,” “East of the Sun’” and “Bye Bye Blues.” It was phenomenal for everyone included in the performance, like the dynamite duo of father and the son Bucky and John Pizzarelli and Judi on the ‘orchestra.’

I only heard her sporadically and not heard in a long time recently. Her singing was neither too impressive nor too flat for me. When she sent me her first  CD you are now looking at or reading about or even listening too, I placed it in my player. I had really enjoyed it. It was an epiphany which I never experienced before, and I knew that she was a swing Jazz singer who sings from the heart and had knowledge and experience fused into the real article.

Some of the numbers she’s expected to perform in her rounded mezzo voice include jazz versions of, “Lady Be Good,” The You and Me That Used to Be,” “London by Night,” and “Foolin’ Myself,” which she said she learned directly from Billie Holiday one of the legends of jazz.

“Jazz is one of the musical forms that go on and on forever,” she said. “Other styles have come along and put it in the background like rock ‘n’ roll did for many years. Now jazz is back as good as ever” and Judi Marie the Swing Jazz Singer is still singing today.

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